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Programs : Brochure

This page is the brochure for your selected program. You can view the provided information for this program on this page and click on the available buttons for additional options.
  • Locations: Florence, Italy; Montepulciano, Italy; Orvieto, Italy; Pisa, Italy; Rome, Italy; Siena, Italy
  • Program Terms: Maymester/Early Summ
Dates / Deadlines:
Dates / Deadlines:
Term Year App Deadline Decision Date Start Date End Date
Maymester/Early Summ 2019 02/01/2019 ** Rolling Admission 05/16/2019 06/20/2019

** Indicates rolling admission application process. Applicants will be immediately notified of acceptance into this program and be able to complete post-decision materials prior to the term's application deadline.
Fact Sheet:
#i18n(14)#
Scholarship Available: Yes Program Type: Study Abroad
Language of Instruction: English Housing Options: Apartments
Minimum GPA: 2.5 (Undergrad), 3.0 (Graduate) Graduate or Undergraduate: Undergraduate
Education Abroad Programs by College: College of Arts, College of Humanities and Social Science, Interdisciplinary Departments: Art, English, Political Science, Political Science and International Affairs, Psychology
Payable Account Code: 8156
Program Description:
Montepulciano - Italy, Summer Session I

**The application deadline for this program is February 1, 2019**

***Note: For acceptance onto the program, students must submit the following by February 1st, 2019:

 
- $300 Non-Refundable Deposit
- Completed Medical Clearance Form*
- Course Selection

*See medical clearance form header below for details

San Biagio


Program Description

The Montepulciano, Italy Summer Study abroad program allows students an opportunity to take lower and upper division course work in historic Tuscany. Montepulciano is centrally located between Rome and Florence with accessible bus and rail transportation to the rest of Italy. Kennesaw State University has overseen this study abroad program, a consortium among Georgia College & State University, Georgia Southern University,  Georgia Highlands College, Valdosta State University, and Kennesaw State University since 2000.

Program Dates

May 16 - June 20, 2019 (these dates are subject to slight change)


3_Montepulciano Summer_Itinerary.pdf
 
 students

Medical Clearance Form Information
A completed medical clearance form is required by February 1st, 2019 for acceptance onto this program. In order to complete the medical clearance form please follow these steps:
1. Print and fill out the medical clearance form provided in your application or here: Education Abroad Medical Clearance Form Final.pdf
2. Print out the physical assessment form here: 9_Montepulciano Summer_Physical Assessment.pdf
3. Print out this brochure page (or at least the part with the program description)
4. Take the medical clearance form, physical assessment, and program description to a licensed medical provider
5. Once the entire medical clearance form is filled out, please return to the Education Abroad Office via mail, fax (470-578-9171), or in-person

Program Cost (subject to slight change)

$5,300.00 Cost includes airfare, housing, four dinners per week, program-related field trips including all admissions/museum entry fees, overnight stay in Florence, and insurance.

***Tuition is not included in the program cost.  Tuition is paid separately to your home institution***

A $300 non-refundable deposit is due at the time of application. This deposit will be subtracted from your total fee. Payments are broken down into two installments. 

1st installment of $2,500.00 is due March 1, 2019
2nd installment of $2,500.00 is due March 15, 2019


For information about scholarships available for this program please visit our website: http://dga.kennesaw.edu/educationabroad/financialaid.php

Housing

Students share two to four bedroom apartments with other students within the program. Although the apartments are located within the historic walls of Montepulciano--the newest being over 300 years old, they are equipped with modern amenities.
 
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Safety & Security

Faculty members will hold several orientations prior to travelling which will be used to discuss how to prepare for your trip and safety and health advice.

State Department:  www.travel.state.gov/travel/
Center for Disease Control (CDC):  www.cdc.gov
 
Health and Safety Additional Information: 
4_Montepulciano Summer_Health&Safety.pdf

Courses

Students MUST take TWO courses, for a total of 6 or 7 credit hours. All courses are offered at the undergraduate level and students from participating universities will be registered for courses at their home institution. See below for course listings and descriptions.

You will select ONE of the following morning courses:

Love, Pleasure, Friendship and the Good Life  – 3-4 Credit Hours*
*GCSU students can receive 4 credits

Instructor: Jim Winchester, GCSU
(KSU: PHIL 4490, GCSU: GCTY/PHIL 4950, GSU: TBD, GHC: TBD, VSU: TBD)
Reading works of philosophy (Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, and Seneca) and literature (Elena Ferrante, a contemporary Italian novelist) we will examine how love, pleasure and friendship have been understood and how these things can contribute to a good life.  This will be a discussion based seminar.


The Arts in Society: Visual Art – 3 Credit Hours
Instructor: Philip Kiernan, KSU
(KSU: ART 1107, GCSU: ARTS 1105/1110, GSU: TBD, GHC: TBD, VSU: TBD)

This interactive course is an introduction to the role of visual art in global societies, from antiquity through the present day. It examines various media within their social, historical, and intellectual contexts; explores a variety of art-historical, art-critical, and theoretical issues; and facilitates critical and analytical thinking. It also teaches students how to analyze the basic elements of art and design and how to visit a museum. (Visits to some venues may require paid admission.)

Early Modern Europe: The Emergence of New Worldviews – 2-3 Credit Hours*
*GHC students can receive 2 credits

Instructor: Jayme Akers Feagin, GHC
(KSU: EUST 2050, GCSU: HIST 4155, GSU: TBD, GHC: TBD, VSU: TBD)
In Early Modern Europe, we survey one of Europe’s most transformational periods, focusing our attention on its diverse political, social, and cultural development of the west as a global force.  History is about understanding change.  Historians tell the story of the past, how events unfold and how change leads to change. Their first task is to observe specific events, but their ultimate job, especially when surveying world civilizations, is to discover general patterns and processes that help them understand and explain those events and the changes they bring.  This course is designed to help the student see those patterns.  It is a compelling story. 
 

Introduction to Italian Language and Culture II – 3 Credit Hours
Instructor: Andrea Scapolo, KSU
(KSU: ITAL 1002, GCSU: ITAL 1002, GSU: TBD, GHC: TBD, VSU: TBD)

Introduction to Italian language and culture, part II, stressing continued, progressive acquisition of effective communication skills in both the written and spoken languages and an understanding of the practices and products of Italian culture.  Not open to native speakers of Italian.

You will select ONE of the following afternoon courses:

Survey of Philosophy - 3 Credit Hours
Instructor: Jim Winchester, GCSU
(KSU: PHIL 2200, GCSU: 2010, GSU: TBD, GHC: TBD, VSU: TBD)

We will begin by reading Plato’s masterpiece The Symposium.  It is the story of a drinking party, where erotic love is discussed.  The text helped give rise to the Italian Renaissance and is one of the most enjoyable philosophic texts ever written.  We will then read two Italian women philosophers who interrogate Plato’s notion of erotic love and finish by reading the great Stoic philosopher Marcus Aurelius. This will be a discussion based seminar.

Roman Art and Archaeology – 3 Credit Hours
Instructor: Philip Kiernan, KSU
(KSU: ARH 3370, GCSU: ARTS 4950, GSU: TBD, GHC: TBD, VSU: TBD)
This course is a survey of the art and architecture of Republican and Imperial Rome, from the first century B.C.E. to the fourth century C.E. It examines a range of media (e.g., coins, pottery, mosaics, sculpture, painting, and architecture) within their social contexts, dealing with such issues as the viewer and viewing; portraiture; gender; ethnicity; social status; domestic space; and urban development. This course incorporates new archaeological discoveries as much as possible, and it encourages students to visit museums.


World Civilizations to 1500 – 3 Credit Hours
Instructor: Jayme Akers Feagin, GHC
(KSU: HIST 1111, GCSU: HIST 1131, GSU: TBD, GHC: HIST 1111, VSU: TBD)

In History 1111 we survey the world’s great civilizations , focusing our attention on its diverse political, social, and cultural development.  History is about understanding change.  Historians tell the story of the past, how events unfold and how change leads to change. Their first task is to observe specific events, but their ultimate job, especially when surveying world civilizations, is to discover general patterns and processes that help them understand and explain those events and the changes they bring.  This course is designed to help the student see those patterns.  It is a compelling story. 
 
Gender and Society in Italy – 3 Credit Hours 
Instructor: Andrea Scapolo, KSU
(KSU: ITAL 4490/GWST 4040, GCSU: WMST 4950/SOCI 3432, GSU: TBD, GHC: TBD, VSU: TBD)
This course examines how gender roles and relations have been shaped and transformed in modern and contemporary Italian society. We cover topics such as the construction of heteronormative male and female identities during fascism, the cultural and legal consecration of the traditional family in the 50s, the new wave of feminism and the gay and lesbian movements in the 60s and 70s, and the legal recognition of same-sex unions in 2016. During the semester, wel analyze the evolution of gender relations in Italy through a variety of cultural products: literary texts, cinema, drama, legal documents, newspaper articles, television programs. We pay particular attention to how in post-war Italy non-conforming gender identities and behaviors have been marginalized or normalized in and through the media.

 
NOTE: All undergraduate students must have and maintain at least a 2.5 GPA to be eligible for this program. If taking this course for graduate credit, students must have and maintain at least a 3.0 GPA to be eligible.

Application Deadline

Applications are due February 1, 2019

A $300 non-refundable deposit is due at the time of application.

Important notes:

- You will NOT be considered for this program until you have paid the deposit AND submitted your completed medical clearance form AND submitted your course selection
- Applications are reviewed in order of receipt of application deposit, medical clearance form, and course selections

 
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Faculty Contact Information

Philip Kiernan (Art and Design: KSU)
pkierna1@kennesaw.edu
Office Phone # 470-578-6139

Jim Winchester (Philosophy: GCSU)
james.winchester@gcsu.edu
Office Phone # 470-445-5513


Jayme Akers Feagin (History: GHC)
jfeagin@highlands.edu
Office Phone # 678-946-1019

Andrea Scapolo (Foreign Language: KSU)
ascapolo@kennesaw.edu
Office Phone # 470-578-5204


Administrative Contact Information

Students from participating institutions should meet with the study abroad advisor on their campus for more information.  Students from other institutions should contact the program office at Kennesaw State University for registration assistance:

Georgia College & State University
Jarris Lanham
jarris.lanham@gcsu.edu
Ph: 478-445-2368

Georgia Southern University
Dorothee Mertz-Weigel
dmertzweigel@georgiasouthern.edu
Ph: 912-344-2804

Kennesaw State University
Katie Emslie
kemslie@kennesaw.edu
Ph: 470-578-4953

Georgia Highlands College
Bronson Long
blong@highlands.edu
Ph: 706-368-7618

Valdosta State University
Irina McClellan
ibmcclel@valdosta.edu
Ph: 229-333-7410


EDUCATION ABROAD REFUND POLICY & PROCEDURES
APPLICATION DEPOSIT
All application deposits are non-refundable, except in the case of:

* Program cancellation by Kennesaw State University
* A wait-listed student who is not added into the program
* A student who has applied to one education abroad program and clearly notifies the Education Abroad Office--in writing and prior to the application deadline--of his/her desire change the application to an alternate KSU program.

Refunds for application fees will be issued in the same form of payment originally used for purchase.  Please be sure to retain all account information used for purchase and notify the Education Abroad Office (EAO) in advance if there is a problem with your account.  The EAO will not be responsible for refunds sent to closed accounts.

PROGRAM FEES

Upon registration for the KSU faculty-led education abroad academic course(s), the designated program fee, which is separate from tuition is charged to the student's account. The student has up to one month to pay the program fee in full, following a specific payment schedule. Failure to pay the program fee in full by the stated deadline may result in deletion from the program.

All program fees are non-refundable. In all cases, the student will only receive recoverable fees, subject to the rules/policies of external service providers.  Any such refund will not include the initial application fee and will not be issued until after the education abroad program is completed.

TUITION PAYMENTS

Payment and refund of tuition will follow the normal processes establish by the Offices of the Registrar and Bursar.  Students wishing to withdraw from any study abroad program or course must submit their request in writing through the Education Abroad Office.